Hysteresis in Marginal Gains

Hysteresis in Marginal Gains

Hysteresis in Marginal Gains

Hysteresis is the term for processes that behave differently in one direction than in another. Understanding it is critical for flying, for dampened suspension systems, and for being aero on your bike. Yep, in this episode we'll be making liberal use of analogies that include a Tempurpedic mattress, a rolling tire, mountain bike suspension and a fair number of Hitchhiker's Guide and Top Gun references. Enjoy this episode of Marginal Gains!

Interesting Links, Sources, and Additional Reading From this Episode

Hysteresis loops for inviscid flow in wings:

Transpulmonary compliance hysteresis

Got a question you’d like to ask Josh? Text or leave a voicemail at the Marginal Gains Hotline: +1-317-343-4506. You can also email us at questions@marginalgainspodcast.cc, or just leave a comment in this post!

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12 comments


  • xcafe

    Hysteresis is the term for processes that behave differently in one direction than in another. Understanding it is critical for flying, for dampened suspension systems, and for being aero on your bike. Yep, in this episode we’ll be making liberal use of analogies that include a Tempurpedic mattress, a rolling tire, mountain bike suspension and a fair number of Hitchhiker’s Guide and


  • Steve Goff

    Great episode. However, did I miss where I’m supposed to be able to use some of this information to determine my ideal tire pressure for various road conditions?


  • Michael Reiter

    As an airline pilot and a cyclist this episode was most enjoyable. Also, loved the “bonus content” regarding the history of the the word hysteria.

    I have a question regarding what would be the most appropriate aero wheel set for me. I’m 5’6", 140 lbs. It’s often windy where I live. I’m more interested in climbing and not getting dropped from the group than sprinting.

    Thanks.


  • Alon

    no. 1 tire with all your weight is equivalent to two tires, each with half your weight – meaning two tires do not have twice as much drag as one tire, but (because each tire is only bearing half the weight) the same amount of drag as riding a wheelie.


  • John Drysdale

    This is an aero question related to the “aero trip” devises we see on cars, wheels, planes. Vortex generators? Tabulators. I forget the term.

    I wonder what if some 3m sticky raised but smooth silicon (or similar) strips would be beneficial to add on the trailing surfaces of the fork, headtube, downtube, heck… seat tube and upper stays. You could make an non aero bike a bit more aero.


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