The Hour Record, Part 4: A Conversation With Robert Chung

The Hour Record, Part 4: A Conversation With Robert Chung

We always planned on our Hour Record trilogy being three episodes long. But then Josh got to talking with Robert Chung — one of Josh's intellectual heroes — and we just had to share it.

If you think most episodes of the Marginal Gains Podcast are too lightweight and you've been jonesing for a show where Josh has an intellectual equal to talk with (mostly but definitely not exclusively about the Hour Record), this is the episode for you.

Got a question you’d like to ask? Text or leave a voicemail at the Marginal Gains Hotline: +1-317-343-4506 or just leave a comment in this post!

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9 comments


  • Historia Kawy

    Ive been meaning to publish about something like this on my website and this gave me an idea. Exactly the stuff I needed.


  • Nick James

    Hey great podcast guys, love it.

    My question: with regards to skewers what’s the best position to angle the lever at to reduce drag?


  • Avoyce N Deether

    From an aerodynamic perspective, same rim profile, same tires, does a 650c wheel produce less drag than a 700c wheel? I would have said this is a no-brainer ‘yes’ since the frontal area of a 650c wheel is less than 85% the frontal area of a 700c wheel but of course it’s probably not that simple! I accept that rolling resistance plus rolling impedance might be a little bit more for a 650c wheel but on a paved surface I doubt that DISadvantage would be enough to overcome the aerodynamic drag ADvantage.

    On the other hand, use of 650c wheels in time trial and triathlon competition has definitely fallen out of favor except for where it makes sense from a bike fit perspective.

    What does the Marginal Gains podcast crew think about this?


  • Tony Geller

    As an inveterate patcher (I have several tubes with ~10 patches), I’m curious but not terribly concerned with the results. For rides where I’m worried about going fast, I replace my patched butyl tubes with latex ones anyway. I can send a heavily patched set of tubes if you like.


  • Joao Godinho

    Hi,

    Thanks so much for bringing us this amazing podcast, the only one that I can’t ever wait to listen!

    My question is in regard to frame compliance efficiency.

    As I understand, there is no conclusive data to prove that laterally stiffer frames are more efficient on power transfer, is that correct?

    Being so, as an average carbon frame user on the really rough tarmac of southwest Ireland, I’m wondering if a more compliant frame material, like steel or titanium, would actually improve power efficiency.

    Despite of being very picky with tire pressure, I had the chance to ride a titanium bike with a similiar geometry and slightly more air on the tires, and found it much more supple.

    Is there a level of roughness of tarmac where the compliance of steel and titanium frames would provide more efficiency than carbon, regardless of using the most adequate tire pressure? Because that’s what I felt.

    Thanks !

    Joao, from Bandon, Ireland


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