A Conversation with Shimano Brand Manager Nick Legan

A Conversation with Shimano Brand Manager Nick Legan

Nick Legan is a name anyone with more than a casual interest in cycling has probably come across. Nick was the tech editor at Velo Magazine and Adventure Cyclist Magazine. He is also the author of the book “Gravel Cycling.”

Josh and Nick talk about Gravel riding, bikepacking (not exactly the aero discussion we normally have around these parts but what the heck), Nick's time as a pro bike mechanic in Europe, running a “Service Only” bike shop in Colorado, coaching and what it’s like to oversee one of the most important component brands on the planet.

Got a question you’d like to ask? Text or leave a voicemail at the Marginal Gains Hotline: +1-317-343-4506 or just leave a comment in this post!

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2 comments


  • Furniture

    Hello :-) Your blog looks good. have a nice day. the blog was absolutely fantastic!


  • Adrian Jackson

    Hi guys, love the podcasts! I’ve got a question that has been on my mind for a while. Tire inserts like Cush Core and Pepi are gaining a lot of popularity in the MTB world, even in XCO races. The most obvious benefit is reducing the chance of rim damage at lower pressure so as to improving grip. Some manufacturers also claim reduced rolling resistance (which may be a by-product of reduced pressure), and that the insert supports the sidewall making the tire more stable under cornering loads. Just to add another dimension a lot of people use lighter/thinner tires with the insert as it adds protection. Overall the decision to use inserts seems to be a complicated trade off between weight, rolling resistance, grip and durability of the tire-wheel system! What are your thoughts on this optimisation problem, mainly for cross-country and endurance MTB races which are my disciplines. Given the insert reduces the air volume, adds another source for loss into the system, may support and “stiffen” the sidewall, and typically is used with lower pressure, I’m particularly interested in what it would be doing for rolling resistance.


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